Revelation 1:3


(3) Blessed is he who reads and those who hear the words of this prophecy, and keep those things which are written in it; for the time is near.

In James 1:22, the apostle admonishes us to be obedient doers, not just hearers, of the Word. In the context of this subject, it means acting and doing the commands so often embedded in the prophetic word. James’ command to act, rather than just to hear, is frequently echoed in prophecy, as in Revelation 1:3: “Blessed is he who reads and those who hear the words [logos] of this prophecy, and keep those things which are written in it; for the time is near.”

The “and” in this verse is very important. God does not say that we are blessed simply if we hear and if we read. This is not to suggest that we should not study God’s prophetic word; of course, we should. All Scripture is given for our edification and our inspiration (II Timothy 3:16). It is all inspired for that purpose. However, we are to read or hear and to keep.

What do we keep? Do we keep predictions about horsemen and beasts? How does one do that? What we are to keep are those commands that are liberally sprinkled throughout the word of prophecy—in the book of Revelation and in the prophetic sections of the gospels and epistles, as well as in the prophecies of the Old Testament. For instance, the letters to the seven churches in Revelation 2 and 3 contain several commands to repent and repeated commands to overcome.

The prophetic word is not just a collection of mind puzzles that we are somehow supposed to unravel. God’s prophecies are not that at all, but they are calls for change. They are calls for our growth. Remember, the blessing comes to those who keep, who do what God commands whether or not we understand the details of the prophecy.

God is faithful. A Christian reading this passage a thousand years ago, who had no idea of what we know of history or of the technology that we understand now, could receive the blessing through obedience, just as we can. Again, knowing is not the issue, but obedience is.

The word “keep” is a command that appears ten times in the book of Revelation. It is the same word that is translated in John 14:15, “If you love Me, keep My commandments.” We will notice just a few of its appearances. The first three are written to three of the seven churches: Thyatira, Sardis, and Philadelphia, respectively:

Revelation 2:26: “. . . keeps My works until the end. . . .”
Revelation 3:3: “. . . hold fast and repent. . . .” [Here, “hold fast” is the same Greek word as “to keep” in the other examples.]
Revelation 3:8: “. . . have kept My word. . . .”
Revelation 12:17: “. . . who keep the commandments of God. . . .” [This is written to the remnant of the seed, that is, to God’s elect.]

As we can see, God has sprinkled this command to “keep” all over the prophecies of Revelation.

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Luke 6:47-48


In this parable, Jesus describes one who hears His words and does them as a man who, when building his house, digs his foundation deeply and upon rock. When a flood threatens it, the house remains intact on its secure base.

Jesus’ metaphor in the parable is apt: A man’s character is like a house. Every thought is like a piece of timber in that house, every habit a beam, every imagination a window, well or badly placed. They all gather into a unity, handsome or grotesque. We decide how that house is constructed.

Unless one builds his character on the rock-solid foundation of God’s Word, he will surely be swept away by the flood now inundating the world. As I Corinthians 3:11 says, “For no other foundation can anyone lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ.”

Of the two builders in the parable, one is a thoughtful man who deliberately plans his house with an eye to the future; the other is not a bad man, but thoughtless, casually building in the easiest way. The one is earnest; the other is content with a careless and unexamined life. The latter seems to want to avoid the hard work of digging deep to ensure a strong foundation, and also takes a short-range view, never thinking what life will be like six months into the future. He trades away future good for present pleasure and ease.

The flood obviously represents the trials of life. Frequently, the trials of life descend upon us either through our own lack of character or because of events in the world around us. Is our house strong enough to withstand the onslaught of the horrendous events of the end time? Can it even withstand our own weaknesses?